VA Diagnostic Criteria for PTSD



Post-traumatic Stress and a new generation of veterans

Support Groups

PTSD
Depression
Anxiety
Chronic Pain
Drug
Grief
Morphine
Stress

What is post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

Describing post traumatic stress in combat veterans

Describing post traumatic stress in combat veterans

Remember those who are supporting our freedom yesterday, today and in the future

Spousal Post-traumatic stress and effects on families and friends

What are the symptoms of post-traumatic stress

What are the diagnosis of post-traumatic stress

PTSD Support Site Forum

Treatment Methods for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

Misdiagnosis of PTSD as another preexisting disorder is becoming used by DoD doctors to discharge military personal with no outside benefits



Remember those who are supporting our freedom yesterday, today and in the future
Females See Action

nav_short_01.gif - 1100 Bytes

Remember those who are supporting our freedom yesterday, today and in the future

How Personal health is affected by post traumatic stress disorder

National Service Organizations that help veterans with ptsd

Personal experiences with the Department of Veterans Affairs

Remember those who are supporting our freedom yesterday, today and in the future

Remember those who are supporting our freedom yesterday, today and in the future

With PTSD a little humor must shine!

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) links Page

 



 




Suffering from Trauma?
PTSD Treatment Works!
Most Insurance Accepted.
Call Today 888-335-8699




Diagnostic Criteria of PTSD.

The following information is what the Veterans Affair's interviewer will be looking for during your intake interview. Its long, BUT please read it all and see how your trauma fits within these guidelines!

  1. The person has been exposed to a traumatic event in which both of the following were present:
    1. The person experienced, witnessed, or was confronted with an event or events that involved actual or threatened death or serious injury, or a threat to the physical integrity of self or others
    2. The person's response involved intense fear, helplessness, or horror.

  2. The traumatic event is persistently re experienced in one (or more) of the following ways:
    1. Recurrent and intrusive distressing recollections of the event, including images, thoughts, or perceptions.
    2. Recurrent distressing dreams of the event.
    3. Acting or feeling as if the traumatic event were recurring (includes a sense of reliving the experience, illusions, hallucinations, and associative flashback episodes, including those that occur on awakening or when intoxicated).
    4. Intense psychological distress at exposure to internal or external cues that symbolize or resemble an aspect of the traumatic event
    5. Physiological reactivity on exposure to internal or external cues that symbolize or resemble an aspect of the traumatic event.

  3. Persistent avoidance of stimuli associated with the trauma and numbing of general responsiveness (not present before the trauma), as indicated by three (or more) of the following:
    1. Efforts to avoid thoughts, feelings, or conversations associated with the trauma
    2. Efforts to avoid activities, places, or people that arouse recollections of the trauma
    3. Inability to recall an important aspect of the trauma
    4. Markedly diminished interest or participation in significant activities
    5. Feeling of detachment or estrangement from others
    6. Restricted range of affect (e.g., unable to have loving feelings)
    7. Sense of a foreshortened future (e.g., does not expect to have a career, marriage, children, or a normal life span)[I don't think I will live to age 62]

    Understanding PTSD A little more

  4. Persistent symptoms of increased arousal (not present before the trauma), as indicated by two (or more) of the following:
    1. Difficulty falling or staying asleep
    2. Irritability or outbursts of anger
    3. Difficulty concentrating
    4. Hypervigilance
    5. Exaggerated startle response

  5. Duration of the disturbance (symptoms in Criteria B, C, and D) is more than 1 month.

  6. The disturbance causes clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning.

Specify if:

  • Acute: if duration of symptoms is less than 3 months
  • Chronic: if duration of symptoms is 3 months or more

Specify if:

  • With Delayed Onset: if onset of symptoms is at least 6 months after the Stressor
  • A personal report. This is a long report that started out a a Stressor letter to the Department of Veterans Affairs. Its called "PTSD: Living with Personal Dragons" and I hope the experience of the letter will help others!

Outside the box PTSD symptoms:

Here are two that the government does not talk about BUT you should be aware of!

Are you running into difficulties within your unit? Like Articles 15ís, poor performance reviews, difficulty with authority? No longer wishing to go to church, if you went before.


View the complete guide to understanding of Post-traumatic Stress


How common is PTSD?




Online Therapy Treatment




Associated Features




Online Therapy Treatment




Differential Diagnosis

Adjustment Disorder; Symptoms of avoidance, numbing, and increased arousal that are present before exposure to the stressor; another mental disorder (e.g., Brief Psychotic Disorder, Conversion Disorder, Major Depressive Disorder); Acute Stress Disorder; Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder; Schizophrenia; other Psychotic Disorders; Mood Disorder With Psychotic Features; a delirium; Substance-Induced Disorders; Psychotic Disorders Due to a General Medical Condition; Malingering.

(www.mentalhealth.com) copyright © 1995-2005 by Phillip W. Long, M.D.


Site by PTSD Support Services, Woodland Park CO: |

webmaster