Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Support Services



Post-traumatic Stress and a new generation of veterans

What is post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

Describing post traumatic stress in combat veterans

Describing post traumatic stress in combat veterans

Remember those who are supporting our freedom yesterday, today and in the future

Spousal Post-traumatic stress and effects on families and friends

What are the symptoms of post-traumatic stress

What are the diagnosis of post-traumatic stress

Treatment Methods for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

Misdiagnosis of PTSD as another preexisting disorder is becoming used by DoD doctors to discharge military personal with no outside benefits



Remember those who are supporting our freedom yesterday, today and in the future
Females See Action

nav_short_01.gif - 1100 Bytes

Remember those who are supporting our freedom yesterday, today and in the future

How Personal health is affected by post traumatic stress disorder

National Service Organizations that help veterans with ptsd

Personal experiences with the Department of Veterans Affairs

Remember those who are supporting our freedom yesterday, today and in the future

Remember those who are supporting our freedom yesterday, today and in the future

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Information Bookstore

With PTSD a little humor must shine!

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) links Page

   

 

 

 


BICEPS Principles for Combat Stress Control


OVERVIEW:
  • (1) Historical perspective
  • (2) Contributing factors
  • (3) Stress reactions
  • (4) BICEPS principles
  • (5) Combat Stress Control Management

Identify facts and principles about combat stress control

(1) Historical Perspective:
  • (a) Civil war – called “nostalgia” or “homesickness”
  • (b) World War I – called “shell-shock” from constant exposure to bombing
  • (c) World War II – called “combat fatigue” resulting from participation in many battles
(2) Contributing Factors
  • (a) Problems at home
  • (b) New/first exposure to combat
  • (c) Loss of buddies
  • (d) Sleep deprivation
  • (e) Lack of information/support
  • (f) Physically run-down
  • (g) Inadequate fitness
  • (h) Dehydration/hunger
  • (i) State of being wet, cold or hot
  • (j) Loss of confidence
(3) Stress Reactions
  • (a) Vary from mild to extreme
  • (b) Psychological reactions
  • 1 Fear (normal reaction for everyone)
  • 2 Hyper-alertness
  • 3 Poor concentration
  • 4 Nightmares/insomnia
  • 5 Anxiety/crying
  • 6 Emotional withdrawal
  • 7 Feelings of guilt
  • 8 Hysterical blindness or paralysis
  • (c) Physical signs and symptoms
  • 1 Exhaustion – predominant factor
  • 2 Hyperventilation
  • 3 Increased blood pressure/heart rate
  • 4 Anorexia, nausea, and/or diarrhea
  • 5 Urinary frequency
  • 6 Gross body tremors/poor body posture
(4) BICEPS Principles
  • (a) BICEPS approach uses six elements to aid in recovery
    • 1 Brevity
    • a Brief treatment, no longer than three days
    • b Usually at second echelon facility
      2 Immediacy
    • a Identify the need for care early – don't wait
    • b Provide care as soon as possible
      3 Centrality
    • a Treat in separate location (not in hospital)
    • b Not physically sick, they just need rest
    4 Expectancy
    • a Member must understand verbally and non- verbally they are returning to duty
    • b Patient is not ill
    • c Symptoms are passing reactions
    • d Recovery is rapid e Wear of uniform while performing details allows member to maintain self-image/military bearing
    5 Proximity
    • a Treat as close to home unit as possible
    • b Allow unit and friends to visit and offer support
    6 Simplicity
    • a Keep treatment directed to patient’s return to duty
    • b No medications unless necessary and only under doctor’s supervision
      • (5) Combat Stress Control Management
      • (a) Treatable if recognized and treated early
      • (b) Principle of reconstruction
1 Phase I – Reconstruction
  • a Basic needs/rest
  • b Hygiene
  • c Food
2 Phase II – Reorientation
  • a Stress management
  • b Anger control
  • c Assertiveness training
  • d Relaxation techniques
  • e Goal setting
3 Phase III – Reintegration
  • a Preparation for return to duty
  • b Work assignments in applicable areas
  • (c) Individual’s role
    • 1 Don't be a loner
    • 2 Help others
    • 3 Know your limits
    • 4 Get at least four hour uninterrupted sleep. Nap when you can
    • 5 Eat enough food
    • 6 Drink water/stay hydrated
    • 7 Good personal hygiene
    • 8 Stay active
  • (d) Supervisor’s role
    • 1 Build esprit de corps
    • 2 Build morale before entering combat
    • 3 Build strong, cohesive, capable unit
    • 4 Assign new troop with older troop
  • (e) Medical personnel’s role
    • 1 Provide non-threatening environment
    • 2 Undisturbed rest
    • 3 Nourishing, appetizing meals
    • 4 Give patient chance to talk to others who are recovering
    • 5 Explain others feel the same way but continue to work
    • 6 Help patient build self confidence
    • 7 Maintain self image/military bearing by having them wear uniform, not pajamas
  • (t) Occupational therapy
    • 1 Function: to provide evaluation and treatment of personnel who show a decrease in performance proficiency and combat effectiveness due to stress or other mental health conditions
    • 2 During Desert Shield/Storm, teams deployed to combat units to disarm any potential problem situations.
  • Given instruction, students will be able to identify facts and principles about combat stress control
    • (1) Historical perspective
    • (2) Contributing factors
    • (3) Stress reactions
    • (4) BICEPS principles
    • (5) Combat Stress Control Management

      Revised Mar 2002



 


Site by PTSD Support Services, Woodland Park CO: |

webmaster